The Holidays from a Counselling Perspective

by Melanie Rathgeber, MC, MA, RCC

The holiday season can bring strong emotions — some positive and some negative — for all of us.  Earlier this year I completed a training course on grief, and I was reminded how beneficial the principles of grief counselling are to many of my clients. Emotional challenges often stem from loss of some kind, and it is important to recognize and process those losses accordingly.  So for the holidays, I wanted to share thoughts on Grief During the Holidays, written by my colleagues at Living Through Loss Counselling Society in Vancouver. I hope their reflections are helpful to you, whether you are experiencing loss yourself, or want to provide comfort to others in your life.  I encourage all my clients to pay special attention to the first point – planning ahead. It will give you some control over the days ahead.  Read below for further thoughts and reflections from experts in this area.

Wishing you all peace, comfort, and hope during this holiday season.  

  – Melanie Rathgeber, Registered Clinical Counsellor

Grief During Holidays (from Living Through Loss Counselling Society)

The pain we experience when we lose someone we love is more intense during special days. The expectation of relaxation, happiness, and celebration makes a sharp contrast to the pain of loss. Nothing can change our reality but there are some things to do to manage grief and help ourselves to cope.

Plan Ahead

Decide in advance how the special day or days will be spent. However, be flexible if you find things aren’t working out as expected. The plan was made to help, not to cause more distress. So be realistic.

Talk About Your Grief

Friends and family do not always understand that your loved one is never out of your mind. Try to give your sorrow words, or write them in a journal. It is healthy to share your memories both happy and sad with people who care.

We Have Tears For A Purpose

Scientists speculate that tears contain a component that has the effect of improving our emotional state. However it works, experience tells us that crying is healing. If you don’t feel comfortable crying in the presence of others, allow time to cry alone. It will relieve the pressure and help you to control your grief in social settings. Holidays are arbitrary but your grief has a life of its own and won’t always allow you to put it on hold.

Re-evaluate Family Traditions

This may help to blunt the sharp sad memories of how things used to be. Consider altering the way things have always been done. Design new rituals and traditions, or do something symbolic to memorialize your loved one.

You Are The Best Authority On Your Grief

During the holidays well meaning friends may try to help by keeping you busy or making sure you are never alone. It is important for you to determine for yourself what is best. Discuss your wishes with someone you trust. It will help clarify your needs and make it easier to explain what your limits are.

Spend Time With People You Trust

Try not to isolate yourself with your feelings. Friends who do not judge your behaviour, who allow you to talk about your grief and accept your feelings are invaluable. Ask them to help you guard against wearing them out! You will need to save their valuable help for the days ahead.

Recognize Your Physical and Psychological Limitations

Most people experience fatigue during grief. Don’t hesitate to excuse yourself from commitments you feel too tired or sad to attend. Keeping busy has its uses but also risks delaying or avoiding sadness that must be experienced to heal. Avoid places, situations and people you believe may cause you stress or anxiety. Instead allow time for simple activities that sooth and relax and provide creative outlets of your own choosing. Allow yourself to just ‘be’.

Use All Resources That Are Available To You

If you have a faith or religion that gives you comfort, this is a time to depend on it. A vacation in a new environment is not necessarily avoidance of a loss, it can help you feel alive again and somewhat involved with life. Sharing feelings with others, even strangers, who have had similar experience can give perspective and assure you that you will survive. Grief counselling in groups or individually can assist you in understanding your grief, and help you to cope with its manifestations. Above all, be kind to yourself and know that your pain is entirely appropriate, considering your loss. Grief comes as a result of love and is a tribute to your relationship.